Hogwarts, mysterious turret rooms and creepy dolls

Hogwarts, mysterious turret rooms and creepy dolls

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On 7th May we were delighted to welcome Frances Hardinge to come and talk to some Year 8 and 9 classes in the Girls’ Division. She told us about her Carnegie nominated book Cuckoo Song and newly published book (on the day of the event) The Lie Tree.  We were also joined by students from Turton School, Smithills School and Bolton Muslim Girls School.

The event was kindly organised by Ebb & Flo books in Chorley and Macmillan Publishers. Unfortunately we weren’t able to offer the event to all students due to exam timetabling. We’re sorry if you missed out but it is still possible to borrow the books, please ask in the Library for more information. A full write up of the event can be found here.

Whilst she was here I showed Frances around the School, she later tweeted that it was ‘Hogwarts.’ I told her about the Turret Library and the mysterious unknown room with a window above the Library. Since Frances gets her ideas from ‘everywhere’ I suggest we watch this space to see if the School appears in a parallel universe next time!

If you haven’t yet read the books I’d like to encourage you to do so. The Lie Tree is a creepy murder mystery set in 19th Century England where the main character, Faith, is a feisty girl challenges the constraints of Victorian femininity. The idea of the Lie Tree is particularly interesting as unlike in other stories, lies are not ‘punished’ or seen as necessarily ‘wrong’ and instead are used to unmask the killer.

I’m part-way through Cuckoo Song and have already decided it’s not a good book to read just as I go to sleep. If you’re a fan of Dr Who, you’ll enjoy Frances Hardinge- she uses the same malevolent twisting of reality, with porcelain, speaking dolls and doppelgangers. Earlier books feature glass-like faces where characters can only speak the truth and vindictive fairies that demand that children who use the coins from a magic well grant everyone’s wishes…

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  1. Pingback: Frances Hardinge’s “The Lie Tree” wins Costa Award – Library Blog

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